Chinese governments use of nationalism in powerful patriots

To evaluate the theory and its implications, I draw upon quantitative and qualitative data gathered over 12 months of field research in China, Hong Kong, and Japan, including more than interviews with government officials, nationalist activists, protest leaders and participants, and foreign policy experts.

She argues convincingly that without visible evidence of popular anger, Chinese leaders, being unelected, have greater difficulty convincing foreign observers that public opinion credibly constrains their diplomatic options. Jessica Chen Weiss has taken us behind the scenes of a crucial form of diplomatic theatre.

She received her Ph.

Powerful patriots : nationalist protest in China's foreign relations

Three case studies, a comparison of anti-Japanese protest in Hong Kong and mainland China, and computerized content analysis of official and commercial Chinese media provide rich support for the theory.

Like audience costs in democratic societies, anti-foreign street protests enable authoritarian leaders to signal resolve and tie hands. Definitely a must-read book.

Reviews Editorial reviews Publisher Synopsis Are Chinese policymakers driven to take more assertive foreign policy positions by the pressure of nationalist public opinion, or do they merely use that opinion as a tool to strengthen their hand in negotiations with other powers.

Her research presents a mechanism by which authoritarian regimes can utilize domestic public opinion to gain international leverage.

Powerful Patriots: Nationalist Protest in China's Foreign Relations

Chen Weiss presents examples of where the Chinese government has succeeded in extracting concessions on the basis of popular pressure. Her probing of nationalist protests is thorough and nuanced. Weiss offers a novel and nuanced argument to explain when and why these protests are allowed--and when and why they are suppressed.

In particular, democratically- elected leaders often state that their hands are tied by constituents or parliamentarians who will punish them at the polls if they back down during negotiations.

The book is an important addition to the small but burgeoning literature on the foreign policy of authoritarian states, and on the role of public opinion in Chinese foreign policy. Fearon, Stanford University "Are Chinese policymakers driven to take more assertive foreign policy positions by the pressure of nationalist public opinion, or do they merely use that opinion as a tool to strengthen their hand in negotiations with other powers.

Why, when, and how do authoritarian governments give their citizens a green, yellow, or red light to protest against foreign targets. In China, anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in and but banned in and These potential "audience costs" represent a bargaining tool in international negotiations.

The argument is tight, and the evidence is both rich and systematically presented. Her research interests include Chinese politics and international relations, nationalism, and social protest. Mershon Center for International Security Studies. This is a book every China watcher will need at hand as the conflicts in the East China Sea and South China Sea set the stage for wider protests in the years to come.

Perhaps it should have been the other way around. Protesters picketed at least one KFC in the province of Hebei; some others showed their displeasure by smashing iPhones footage of which was, ironically, often shared via iPhone ; and a bunch of online dried mango retailers claimed to have dropped suppliers in the Philippines.

Her probing of nationalist protests is thorough and nuanced. Mershon Center for International Security Studies. Weiss presents a nuanced but clear answer in favor of the latter position. I also make use of Chinese government documents, press reports, and internet archives.

Because anti-foreign protests may turn against the government, allowing such protest makes it costly for the government to make diplomatic concessions and demonstrates resolve in international bargaining. They've made the tiger roar for their own purposes, but its sharp teeth may yet to bite them, and us" --WORLD Magazine "Chen Weiss sustains her argument well.

Essential reading for anyone interested in possiblepaths to interstate war and regime change in Asia.

Powerful patriots : nationalist protest in China's foreign relations

In China, anti-American protests were permitted in and but repressed in Anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in and but banned in and Protests over Taiwan, the issue of greatest concern to Chinese nationalists, have never been allowed.

'Powerful Patriots' examines the role of nationalist protest in China's foreign relations from toarguing that the Chinese government's decision to allow or repress potentially destabilizing anti-foreign street demonstrations reveals information about its resolve and willingness to compromise in diplomacy.

'Powerful Patriots' examines the role of nationalist protest in China's foreign relations from toarguing that the Chinese government's decision to allow or repress potentially destabilizing anti-foreign street demonstrations reveals information about its resolve and willingness to compromise in diplomacy.

She teaches courses on anti-Americanism in world politics, Chinese foreign policy, and state-society relations in post-Mao China. In her presentation, Weiss will provide an analysis of why the Chinese government sometimes allows and sometimes suppresses nationalist anti-foreign demonstrations and explore the consequences of this choice for China’s international relations.

I argue that by allowing nationalist protests against foreign states, non-democratic leaders can use domestic politics for international gain. In China, anti-Japanese protests were tolerated in and but banned in and Anti-American protests were permitted in.

Powerful Patriots traces China's management of dozens of nationalist protests and their consequences between and Read more Read less Give the gift of reading, now $Author: Jessica Chen Weiss.

Chinese governments use of nationalism in powerful patriots
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Powerful Patriots: Nationalist Protest in Chinese Foreign Relations